About Me

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Delta, British Columbia, Canada
I took very early retirement from teaching in '06 and did some traveling in Europe and the UK before settling down to do some private tutoring. As a voracious reader, I have many books waiting in line for me to read. Tell me I shouldn't read something, and I will. I'm a happy, optimistic person and I love to travel and through that believe that life can be a continuous learning experience. I'm looking forward to traveling more some day. I enjoy walking, cycling, water aerobics & and sports like tennis, volleyball, and fastpitch/baseball. I'm just getting into photography as a hobby and I'm enjoying learning all the bits and bobs of my digital camera. My family is everything to me and I'm delighted to be the mother of two girls and the Gramma of a boy and a girl. I may be a Gramma, but I'm at heart just a girl who wants to have fun.

Friday, September 18, 2015

K is for British slang words

 

No story, no moral, no point today except to bring you a few odd British words that we also use in Canada that begin with the letter K.  Just for fun.
 
KERFUFFLE (a big fuss)
 
 
KNACKERED  (tired, exhausted)
 
 
KNICKERS (underwear)
 
 
KNOCK UP  (wake up)
 

KNICK (to steal)


 KNEES UP (to party hardy)

 
So there you have it - some strange vocabulary for some but if anyone has any British heritage at all, I'm sure you've heard at least some of these.  Thanks to the adorably kitschy Mrs. Nesbitt, the creator of ABC Wednesday and to our keen administrator Roger.  Also many thanks to each member of the team who leaves knockout comments so everyone feels welcome.

17 comments:

Melody Steenkamp said...

Your entry puts a smile on my face, a big one ... thank you!

Have a nice ABC-Week / Day
♫ Mel☺dy ♫

Roger Owen Green said...

Kerfuffle shows up in political discussions. "Donald Trump's comment about X caused a kerfuffle."

ROG, ABCW

Gigi Ann said...

I have to admit the first time I heard "Knock Up" used as "Wake Up" it threw me for a loop...I still have trouble with that one....

Berowne said...

Remember "Knees Up, Mother Brown"?

Arnoldo L. Romero, MLA said...

Knickers is not that common anymore in the USA, but you do hear it sometimes. Knocked up means getting pregnant in the US, so be careful using anything like that here. Happy ABC Wednesday, my friend!

Hildred said...

My British heritage makes all these familiar - even the 'knock up'!

Photo Cache said...

What a fun post.

Frankly My Dear

Beverley Baird said...

A definite smile indeucer and a few chuckles as well! Great post.

Joy said...

So funny Leslie. Kerfuffle is a great word which generally seems to be said in a sentence as 'a bit of a kerfuffle '. Don't know why ,one of the mysteries of language.

Norma Ruttan said...

leave it to the Brits for some funny cartoons using their language a bit different from American English.

ellen b. said...

A fun post to read! Have a great week and keep smiling...

Ann said...

Love the word kerfuffle, I like trying to find ways to use it. Oh and I really love the Maxine cartoon.
Ann

photowannabe said...

Fun words.
My Hubby had a woman working for him that was from England.
She told him that a male friend had "come to knock her up"
Hubby said what????
She meant he had come to visit her at her home.


(:0)

Su-sieee! Mac said...

Has someone already told you that in the U.S., knocked up means to be pregnant? I can hardly wait to tell someone that we ought to get knees up.
The View from the Top of the Ladder

beataboutthebook said...

This was such a fun post. Some were new ones, though - knees up - never heard of that.

Priya said...

Loved reading this one !! :)

Liz Hinds said...

Knocked up means getting pregnant in the UK too. As does up the duff.